Revealing female encounters in ‘Jane Eyre’

With close reference to at least two other parts of the novel, consider the view that ‘the most revealing encounters in Jane Eyre are between female characters’. Throughout the novel, Jane encounters many characters who reveal different aspects of her as a person, both to herself and the reader. A Bildungsroman, we see these encounters … More Revealing female encounters in ‘Jane Eyre’

Compare the presentation of memories in ‘Before You Were Mine’ and ‘Wild Oats’.

In Before You Were Mine, Duffy reminisces through looking at a one or more photographs of her late mother, idolizing her life and perhaps unnecessarily blaming herself for the changes she saw in her mother before and after she was born. Larkin reflects on an event that appears to have shaped a rather large part … More Compare the presentation of memories in ‘Before You Were Mine’ and ‘Wild Oats’.

Consider some of the ways in which Donne’s poetry could be said to be ambitious in its style and subject matter.

To be ambitious is to have a strong need and determination to succeed – something Donne had in many aspects of his life. From his poetry, relationship with God, to his personal life, Donne had a ‘restless desire for work and for worldly success’. Perhaps Donne’s most ambitious move was his decision to marry Anne … More Consider some of the ways in which Donne’s poetry could be said to be ambitious in its style and subject matter.

Exploring Donne’s attitudes to love and relationships in his poetry. 

Explore the attitudes towards love and relationships in two or three poems of your choice, and analyse some of the ways that Donne presents these attitudes. In all of his poems, there is a ‘strikingly similar’ audacity with which Donne conveys his feelings about love and relationships, whether those be poems about his life experiences, … More Exploring Donne’s attitudes to love and relationships in his poetry. 

The Tempest: Prospero’s assessment of Caliban in Act IV.ii.188-193

PROSPERO:         A devil, a born devil, on whose nature                                 Nurture can never stick; on whom my pains                                 Humanely taken, all, all lost, quite lost;                                 And, as with age his body uglier grows,                                 So his mind cankers. I will plague them all,                                 Even to roaring. How far do you agree … More The Tempest: Prospero’s assessment of Caliban in Act IV.ii.188-193